Movie Review: Godzilla – King of The Monsters

Godzilla: King of The Monsters is a big dumb mess that consists of relentless dimly-lit destruction, incoherent plot, and mediocre action.

The heroic efforts of the crypto-zoological agency Monarch face off against a battery of god-sized monsters, including the mighty Godzilla, who collides with Mothra, Rodan, and his ultimate nemesis, the three-headed King Ghidorah. When these ancient super-species—thought to be mere myths—rise again, they all vie for supremacy, leaving humanity’s very existence hanging in the balance.

Godzilla: King of The Monsters sounds like a blockbuster recipe for success. You got a bunch of Titans, overqualified actors, enough VFX technology, and a budget of about $200 million.

Unfortunately, all of that was put to waste. The script comes up with the most inane reasons to bring these monsters together into a film, all of which are executed via people doing stupid doings.

Dr. Emma Russell goes off the grid for several years with her daughter and becomes a follower of The Thanos School of Thought. She decides that the planet is in dire need of culling before mankind destroys everything. By using monsters that are being studied and monitored by Monarch (as what shady organizations do of course), this Euthanasia will become a reset button.

On paper, this isn’t the silliest nor worst of ideas once you’ve seen Sharktopus vs. Whalewolf. On screen however, everything doesn’t make a lick of sense because Godzilla 2 tries to be an action adventure, monster feature, and apocalypse movie all at the same time, ripping off Jurassic Park, Armageddon and Independence Day.

Gifted with a plane equipped with plot magic, the good guys follow the bad guys around the globe to different Monarch bunkers. This showcase reel becomes repetitive as the good guys look at computer screens while its military force shoots MUTOs in vain as they are released from containment.

The three most memorable are featured – Mothra, Ghidorah, and Rodan – while the rest get cameos. Godzilla eventually appears after 45 minutes.

Someone thought it would be cool to shroud these monsters in all kinds of storms – thunderstorms firestorms, blizzards, and tornadoes. What you get is a dimly-lit movie that doesn’t make any of the CGI scenery suspend your disbelief. You wouldn’t know what’s going on until someone dies or something blows up. It doesn’t help that compositions do little to provide convincing imagery – the MUTOs are mostly seen through portholes and windows.

You do get a scale of the Titans a few times. Apart from a from the few money shots the showdowns are uninspired. With repetitive pyrotechnics, city destruction, and monster moves, everything becomes tiring. And why does Godzilla fight these monsters? No one knows.

In the middle of all this are an underused cast used for exposition. Charles Dance is here as an eco-terrorist because they needed someone to say “Long live the king” in a cool British accent.

In fairness, the humans don’t really matter here anyway. The movie doesn’t have enough time to feature 17 monsters so it uses a tired yet understandable enough solution to wrap this all up in one fight. The movie finishes off with one big power move that in retrospect, could’ve been accomplished by a bunch of ballistic missiles.

Godzilla: King of The Monsters is essentially a forgettable disaster flick that just happens to have MUTOs in it. But hey, if you have zero expectations, have the money to burn, and just want to see a big lumbering mutated radioactive iguana, then by all means, watch it.

My Rating: 4/10

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