Camp X-ray has a promising concept and good performances but its eclipsed by a dull, overstretched and inconsequential narrative.

A soldier (Kristen Stewart) assigned to Guantanamo Bay befriends a man who has been imprisoned there for eight years.

Camp X-ray has a lot of potential.

Its concept can spark a good discussion about the questionable ethics of the war on terrorism by showing the dehumanizing conditions of incarceration that may not even be justified in the first place.

The film delivered a believable look into the US military through the perspective of a female soldier, with Amy feeling more marginalized by the day because of a sexist Colonel.

The actors deliver good performances, enough to build empathy for two characters who are both imprisoned in their own way. Kristin Stewart’s role fits her very limited range while Peyman Moaadi is just great.

Unfortunately, the movie doesn’t go anywhere interesting as the plot drags on.

The platonic relationship between “blondie” and Ali is contrived. A soldier who aims to break free of her boring small town roots happens to end up in Gitmo, where another poor hapless soul is there for her to empathize with.

The movie steers clear of any political thought and doesn’t have anything to say about the obviously morally gray situation.  It aims to tell the viewers that nothing is black and white, but doesn’t substantiate it. The narrative focuses on the interaction between its leads, but this leads nowhere. None of them are memorable because of passive conversations that barely scratch the surface of the characters.

In the end, Amy and Ali are just passing acquaintances for each other, whether they learned something or not, we’ll never know.

My Rating: 5/10

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