Kingsman: The Secret Service aims to be a palate cleanser from all serious James Bond films we’ve had lately, but fails by wasting its potential and sticking to the formulaic action template.

Kingsman: The Secret Service tells the story of a super-secret spy organization that recruits an unrefined but promising street kid into the agency’s ultra-competitive training program just as a global threat emerges from a twisted tech genius. – Fox

John Wick approves

Spy films have gone too serious for people who just want big guns, hot girls, funny villains, and a poor yet handsome hero. Thus, Kingsman was born. Based from the comic book The Secret Service, Kingsman attempts to put some fun in the spy genre.

The casting is perfect, with plenty of posh suave from Colin Firth. Taron Egerton is a likeable chap, Samuel Jackson is entertaining as always (although the effect does wear off as he piles on the affectations), and the rest do well with what they’re given.

After what seems to be a promising start, Kingsman devolves into fodder, the contrived and cliched kind that Hollywood studios mass produce and release in the summer to make a quick buck from mainstream viewers who want their movie like their junk food – easily digestible and visually appetizing but shallow and generic.

In fact, it sounds like the Seventh Son, which is a live version of every RPG you’ve played – the tale of the unlikely candidate chosen by an old veteran who must prepare himself to battle a comical villain who wants to conquer the world.

Granted that this is a blockbuster film, familiar elements would definitely make up its foundation. However, Kingsman wastes all its potential elements to become the antithesis to the serious Bond films.

The lead was given time to develop, but Eggsy’s training was useless and merely used for laughs. Action sequences had verve, but they’re just over-stylized meaningless violence. There were females in the cast, but they were just used as props. The villain uses biotechnology that reflects modern warfare, but his practical idea is dumbed down into a stupid plan (despite being a tech geek millionaire) lest it becomes too deep for what it perceives as its gullible audience.

Overall, Kingsman is just another recycled junk food.  It makes no attempt to distinguish itself apart from the rest of the items in the menu of Blockbuster fodders.

My Rating: 4/10

Alternative Movie Poster from Sunday Dog Parade

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