The 7th son is a stereotypical fantasy B-movie that would have gone direct-to-video if it weren’t for its popular actors, whose talents are wasted on a badly written trite film that has no redeeming qualities.

Tom Ward (Ben Barnes) gets selected for apprenticeship by John Gregory (Jess Bridges), a local Spook responsible for getting rid of evil creatures. As the seventh son of the seventh son he is chosen as the successor, but will he succeed where others have failed against the most powerful witch in the country?

The Seventh Son is plagued with lazy writing and has no redeeming qualities.

The tired old narrative of the “unlikely candidate” who gets chosen for a mission where the fate of the world is at stake. He becomes an apprentice to a “grumpy old man who turns out to be a great fighter”. Together they must defeat the “evil Queen and her henchmen before she gains full power”. And yes, there’s an odd creature servant that doubles as comic relief. But whatever humor there is gets lost because of the awful dialogue.

The villains are tropes. The evil queen is a scorned woman jilted by her ex (guess who). The henchmen are your typical shady foreigners from exotic cultures who die on cue. For example there’s a Master Assassin, but he doesn’t do anything stealthy and his men are just cannon fodder. There’s a loyal sister there somewhere but she’s a Deus ex Machina. Her daughter is used as a love interest in a shallow relationship.

The one dimensional cast of characters are all forgettable.The actors did what they can but there’s only so much that they can do. Ben Barnes is adequate enough but has no chemistry with the Alicia Vikander. Jeff Bridges tries but his efforts to make Wizard Cogburn Master Gregory  endearing is lost in the cliche of it. Julian Moore is reliable, but Eva Green is a better fit for the role. The exception would be Jon Snow Kit Harrington, who manages to make a memorable cameo because of his awful acting.

Considering this is a blockbuster, you can’t expect much depth. The protagonist goes through minimal character development to give way for the action (think Kristen Stewart’s Snow White who turned into Joan of Arc after a trip in the dark forest).

Unfortunately, the movie isn’t entertaining either with B-movie action scenes. The magic is underused, the brawls are generic, and the rest of the effects are hampered by low budget CGI.

The seventh Son is another book to hopefully blockbuster adaptation. However, it ended up as the type of fantasy B-movie that makes rounds in cable TV as a forgettable filler before the weekend special feature.

My Rating: 1/10

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