Despite its generic components, Big Hero 6 is a highly entertaining and technically accomplished animated movie that is  unafraid to tackle adult themes and more diverse than most real life Hollywood films.

Big Hero 6 is an action-packed comedy-adventure about robotics prodigy Hiro Hamada, who learns to harness his genius—thanks to his brilliant brother Tadashi and their like-minded friends: adrenaline junkie Go Go Tamago, neatnik Wasabi, chemistry whiz Honey Lemon and fanboy Fred. When a devastating turn of events catapults them into the midst of a dangerous plot unfolding in the streets of San Fransokyo, Hiro turns to his closest companion – a robot named Baymax – and transforms the group into a band of high-tech heroes determined to solve the mystery. [Walt Disney Animation Studios]

Big Hero 6 has enough blockbuster elements to make it work – a robot that you can’t help but love, vivid animation, big scale action, and of course an emotional story.

Baymax provides a refreshing oddity in today’s perfectly rendered but dead eyed CGI images. He’s cartoonish and inflatable, which makes his super-powered transformation all the more funny. His voice is suitably naive and harmless.

The animation in the film is amazing. The characters look like they exist in a real hybrid world of an American city splashed with Japanese culture. The attention to detail injects more real life dimensions to their costumes. This also adds a fluid motion to the inventive big scale action.

Big Hero 6 has a poignant story that tackles adult themes. Its huggable robot creates an interesting juxtaposition in the narrative.

All of this makes for great meaningful entertainment but Big Hero 6 wastes its potential by resorting to the generic team action fanfare.

Underneath the hood are generic components recycled from other movies. The kinship between a kid and a robot. The gang of misfits which eventually learn to band together. The vengeful villain blindsided by hate.

The film would still be good even with some of these familiar elements if it weren’t overstuffed with one note team players. Big Hero 6 should have focused on Hiro and Baymax, using parallels in its story to add more weight to its themes. This would have been a big lesson with an emotional and intellectual punch.

Unfortunately Big Hero 6 tries to pull off a Marvel formula and loses sight of what it already has. In the end, the film resorts to a heart tugging moment reminiscent of “Up”, after already borrowing from “How to Train Your Dragon” and ” The Incredibles”.

Nonetheless it is an entertaining and technically accomplished movie carried by a new character favorite.

My Rating: 7.5/10

Alternative Movie Poster by Tom Miatke

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