Drive is a stylish indie thriller for the discerning moviegoer, whether you’re a Gosling fan or not.

Ryan Gosling plays an unnamed wheel man who drives stunt cars during the day and get away vehicles by night. Although he is a lone wolf by nature, he can’t help but fall in love with a young mother. But when she gets dragged into trouble along with her kid by her ex-convict husband, the driver is forced to shift gears and risk his life for the woman he loves.

Drive is a well directed film with excellent cinematography, acting and editing.

The movie is filled with drawn out scenes accompanied by a cool 80′s synthpop soundtrack (that somehow justifies that old Mistral font)  mixed with striking imagery of violence that keeps the tension all the way through. Drive relies on subtext and its character’s actions to convey its message, which makes it an engrossing film despite the sparse dialogue.

Ryan Gosling excels as the self-contained driver. He is charming, but can also muster some quiet intensity that adds mystery to the character.  The rest of the cast was good too, with Carey Mulligan as the love interest.

People with certain expectations though wouldn’t be impressed by its subtleties. The whole movie is slick with a retro feel, but it’s too somber for a crime action film. There isn’t much to the story too.

Despite its title there are few driving scenes, and most of the action is derived from gory shots that come out of nowhere. The film is mostly made to accommodate the mood it’s going for.

In spite of this, Drive perfectly pulls off what it sets out to be – an art house action film. If you’re a moviegoer with a long attention span who’s in the mood for something contemplative and stylish then this is for you.

My Rating: 8/10

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