It’s a well acted movie that pokes fun at the indie film industry but falls empty for the sake of parody.

Three ambitious misguided filmmakers are set to make an indie film that will pave the way for a prestigious critically acclaimed career. Through the imagination of their silent production assistant, a part of the film is played out in different versions as the director and producer contemplate on various scenarios that will turn it into an international award winning masterpiece. The said film is about Mila, a poor mother living in the slums who sells her child to a pedophile for money.

The movie is an entertaining satire of the indie film industry’s penchant for poverty porn. The movie within a movie’s script titled “Walang-wala” undergoes different versions – from a low budget take on social realism, to a documentary, then randomly into a musical.

It also takes a stab at mainstream melodramas as Eugene Domingo’s version shows unrealistically coiffed poor characters and exaggerated scenes. She also gets pulled into the satire as a parody of herself.

The filmmakers weren’t spared from this too as the group lounges in a coffee shop armed with a Mac and an iPad, reminiscent of pretentious well educated twenty somethings who hang around at Starbucks. In the same scene the joke continues as a more successful acquaintance drops by with his entourage, name-dropping repeatedly and mispronouncing espresso.

All the actors here are good, but not as much as Eugene Domingo as she showcases her talents, shifting from comedy to drama. She eclipses everyone here that it makes me want to see Kimi Dora.

The movie ends with a hilarious finish but there’s nothing  much beyond a running joke of sequences 34-40. The movie strayed away from its main story that the ending made me feel like it was cut short. Me and the other audiences in the cinema couldn’t believe that it was already finished as the credits rolled. Nonetheless the film succeeded as a parody.

My Rating: 7/10

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